Real Estate Investors' Future 

If you are a serious real estate investor,  then you should know what the future holds before its gets here.  Where is the real money being made?  Where are the biggest values?  Is is still wise to invest in real estate?

Real estate continues to be one of the most viable methods of building wealth.

According to FOX Business,

When the housing market imploded in 2007 and took the economy with it, experts said the real estate market would never look the same again. Now, nearly six years after the crash, the dust has finally cleared and we have a true picture of the new housing landscape.

While investors may still be leery of hopping back into the market, housing starts, prices and confidence are on an upward trend and the tide may be turning this year to favor homesellers.

Homebuyers can expect a more competitive market in 2013, and should start the mortgage lending process at least three months before they plan to start seriously looking because experts expect the process to take several months under new lending standards. House hunters should be ready to deal right away as inventory is expected to remain at low levels throughout the year.

Homesellers are shifting into the driver’s seat with experts expecting bidding wars to break out in certain markets due to the low inventory. While homes will sell quicker this year, they still have to be priced right.

Read more: http://www.foxbusiness.com/personal-finance/2013/01/17/housing-market-in-2013-what-to-expect/#ixzz2JeqLUuYG

US Median List Price

US Median Sale Price

Plus, as a reference document to add to your library, here is the latest Price WaterHouse Cooper trend analysis for 2013

pwc-emerging-trends-in-real-estate-2013

One the flip side Trulia reports a slightly different picture:

The big question this year was whether home prices had finally hit bottom. We now know the answer is a resounding “yes.” Every major index shows asking and sales prices rising in 2012.

The key question in 2013, though, is whether prices will rise enough so that for-sale inventory — which has fallen 43 percent nationally since the summer of 2010 — will hit bottom and start expanding again. The sharp decline in inventory was a necessary correction to the oversupply of homes after the bubble, but now inventory is below normal levels and holding back sales, particularly in California and the rest of the West.

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